On Wednesday evening (16th Oct), the Dumfries Archival Mapping Project is at the Gordon Memorial Hall in Castle Douglas giving a talk entitled ‘Maps & Mines, Hopes & Fears: 250 years of geological mapping in Galloway’.

Expert Geologist, Dr Alan Gibbs will talk, with the particular assistance of the Carsphairn Heritage Group, about the areas rich mining history, considering what we can learn from historic maps of the area and how this influences the landscape we see today.

The Dumfries Archival Mapping project (DAMP) aims to catalogue, analyse and interpret pre-ordnance survey maps, also archiving maps they find on the National Library of Scotland website. The project goes from strength to strength and anyone who has attended a previous DAMP event will know they are an excellent opportunity to learn about the maps and landscape of our past, while always being very entertaining!

 

Speaking ahead of the event which is scheduled for 7.30pm on the 16th of October, DAMP’s Archie McConnel said:

“Alan Gibbs is one of the UK’s top geologists…and he is also a great speaker. He will be talking about the industrial history of the area as well, and all as recorded on maps!  It should be a fun evening!  And please do get in touch if you have any pre-OS estate maps of the region!”

 

DAMP is undertaking a range of map-hunting activities and events in the Stewartry over coming years, supported by a grant from the Galloway Glens Landscape Partnership Scheme. Nick Chisholm, Galloway Glens Project Officer, said:

“Britain has a long tradition of producing the very best maps in the world, Ordnance Survey is a true British icon. The OS maps typically started in the 1850s, but we have a long tradition of producing remarkably accurate and aesthetically pleasing examples prior to this. These maps shine a light on long forgotten landscapes, traditions and industries. They are an archive of historic information that has relevance for land management today. This forthcoming event on mining will shine a Davie lamp into the world of old maps, then and now.”

 

The event is free to attend, with any donations welcomed towards DAMP funds.