ChargePlace Scotland now has over 1000 publicly available electric vehicle charge points.

This is a milestone moment in the continued development of one of the most comprehensive electric vehicle charging networks in Europe. The average distance between any given location to the nearest public charging point is just 2.78 miles in Scotland – compared to 3.77 miles in England.

ChargePlace Scotland will continue to develop and it was announced earlier this year that 800 more public charging points are planned through the Switched on Towns and Cities Challenge Fund and the Local Authority Installation Programme. This far exceeds the 2018 Programme for Government commitment to deliver 150 new public charge points and demonstrates the Scottish Government’s determination to phase out the need for new petrol and diesel cars and vans by 2032.

The Cabinet Secretary for Transport, Infrastructure and Connectivity Michael Matheson made the announcement as he visited East Ayrshire Council’s first fully electric car park on Waterside Street in Kilmarnock. The council have received over half a million pounds in 2018/19 from the Scottish Government to support this project and others.

Cabinet Secretary for Transport, Infrastructure and Connectivity Michael Matheson said:

World-class charging infrastructure is critical in developing range confidence and encouraging people to make the switch to electric vehicles. At the same time, the continued development of our infrastructure sends a global message that Scotland is ready for a revolution in e-mobility.
“The uptake of ultra-low emission vehicles is central to our Energy Strategy, our Climate Change Plan and our goal of making Scotland’s air quality the best in Europe. It’s fantastic that Scotland now benefits from over 1000 charge points including close to two hundred 50 kilowatt rapid chargers.
“I’m proud to make this announcement from Kilmarnock where East Ayrshire Council have recently opened their first electric car park. Every bay can support electric vehicle charging and this level of ambition supports our ambition to phase out the need for new petrol and diesel cars and vans by 2032.“